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Social Media All-Stars Unite to Create “The Social Cookbook” to Benefit @InvisiblePeople.tv

19 Sep

Chris Brogan, Brian Solis, Liz Strauss and a Dozen Other Web Celebs Donate Recipes for Cookbook App to Help the Homeless

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

InvisiblePeople.tv has teamed up with BakeSpace.com and some of the most visible people in social media to create “The Social Cookbook” – a first-of-its-kind app-based fundraising cookbook to raise funds to fight homelessness.

Get the Social Cookbook App!

Created with BakeSpace’s Cookbook Café digital publishing platform, “The Social Cookbook” is available for download on the iPad via the free Cookbook Café app, as well as online as a web-based e-book. It includes personal recipes from 19 highly respected social media influencers – from Chris Brogan and Liz Strauss to Brian Solis and Beth Kanter.

Watch: How InvisiblePeople.tv, the organization helping homelessness via social media, has teamed with BakeSpace.com to create the first crowd-sourced cookbook from social media

The cookbook costs $2.99 to download, and all proceeds (after Apple’s App Store fee) go to support InvisiblePeople.tv and its efforts to fight homelessness using the power of social media. The organization is a nationally-recognized 501(c)3 nonprofit founded in 2008 by Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal on Twitter). Its mission is to empower the homeless to tell their stories, build community and connect with support services by helping them get online and have a voice.

To build “The Social Cookbook,” a list of all-star social media influencers contributed their favorite personal recipes including:

  • David Armano’s “Popo Mikey’s Famous Stuffing & Mom’s Turkey Gravy” (@armano)
  • Chris Brogan’s “Poor Man’s Shepherd’s Pie” (@chrisbrogan)
  • C.C. Chapman’s “Soggy Saturday Wings” (@cc_chapman)
  • Claire Diaz-Ortiz’s “Sugar Cookies” (@Claire)
  • Sarah Evans’ “Blueberry Whole Wheat Pancakes with Bananas” (@PRsarahevans)
  • Jason Falls’ “Potato and Egg Salad” (@jasonfalls)
  • Sean Gardner’s “Lasagna” (@2morrowknight)
  • Beth Kanter’s “Kachumber Salad” (@kanter)
  • Jason Keath’s “Dirty Greek Eggs” (@jasonkeath)
  • Shira Lazar’s “Shira’s Social Sangria” (@shiralazar)
  • Stefanie Michaels’ “Eggs ala Salsa” (@adventuregirl)
  • Amy Neumann’s “Simple Homemade Pickles” (@CharityIdeas)
  • Amber Naslund’s “Chicken Tortilla Soup” (@ambercadabra)
  • Lee Odden’s “Philly Cheese Steak Rolls” (@leeodden)
  • Jeff Pulver’s “Jeff Pulver’s Jackson Hole Shakshuka” (@jeffpulver)
  • Peter Shankman’s “Mom’s Calming Noodles and Cheese” (@petershankman)
  • Mari Smith’s “Mom’s Scottish Shortbread” (@marismith)
  • Brian Solis’ “Tortilla Espanola” (@briansolis)
  • Liz Strauss’ “Grilled Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich” (@lizstrauss)

“I love that this cookbook brings together some of the most visible people in social media to help some of the least visible people in our society,” said InvisiblePeople.tv Founder Mark Horvath. “I’m grateful to everyone who helped create ‘The Social Cookbook,’ as well as everyone who downloads it to help fight homelessness.”

To preview excerpts from the cookbook and learn more, visit http://bit.ly/thesocialcookbook.

“Fundraising cookbooks have been around for a long time, so our goal for Cookbook Café was to update the publishing process and make it easier, more efficient and more rewarding,” said BakeSpace.com Founder Babette Pepaj. “We wanted to come up with a technology that democratizes cookbook publishing and helps nonprofits like InvisiblePeople sweeten their fundraising efforts.”

Learn more about our homeless friends, aka “Invisible People,” Mark Horvath and InvisiblePeople.tv are helping us see using social media to spread their stories.

Cookbook Café enables anyone (individuals, groups, brands, etc.) to publish a cookbook as both a web-based e-book and an iPad app quickly, easily and at no cost.

Once a cookbook is published, the author can give it away for free or sell it to the world for profit or fundraising. Cookbooks are sold online and on the iPad via Cookbook Café’s community-driven marketplace, which makes it easy for shoppers to discover even the most niche cookbooks. “The Social Cookbook” is the first cookbook published using Cookbook Café’s new groups feature, which enables groups of any size to crowdsource recipes and work together to build a cookbook.

Earlier this year, Cookbook Café was recognized by the Webby Awards and the IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals) in the best social app and use of new technology categories. The do-it-yourself publishing platform includes: 1) The free Cookbook Café iPad app with cookbook storefront and reader, 2) A web-based version of the storefront and reader accessible via any web browser, and 3) A web-based book builder that automatically publishes each cookbook as both an iPad app and web-based e-book. More information about Cookbook Café is available at http://CookbookCafe.com. To make an original cookbook, visit BakeSpace.com/cookbooks – it’s free!

About InvsiblePeople.tv

InvisiblePeople.tv is a grassroots 501(c)3 nonprofit founded in 2008 by Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal on Twitter) to fight poverty and homelessness using the power of online social media. The organization launched its sister site – WeAreVisible.com – in September 2010 as a resource to educate homeless people, help them get online and connect with support services. After building a successful career in television syndication, Mark found himself homeless in 1995 following a battle with addiction. He worked hard to clean up his act, and was living comfortably by 2007 with a three-bedroom house and a 780 credit score. But then the recession hit. After several layoffs and a foreclosure, he was once again facing homelessness. That’s when Mark launched InvisiblePeople.tv with just $45 and a budding interest in social media. More information is available at http://InvisiblePeople.tv and http://WeAreVisible.com.

About Cookbook Cafe and BakeSpace.com

Launched in 2006 as the Web’s first food social network, BakeSpace.com has been described by USA Today as “the closest thing to a Facebook-like food site.” It has earned numerous Webby Award honors including back-to-back nominations for “Best Social Network.” The company’s ‘Cookbook Café’ publishing platform is the first DIY digital publishing tool that enables anyone to create, market and sell a cookbook as both a native iPad app and a web-based eBook. BakeSpace also produces the TECHmunch Food Blogger Conference, which is held in cities across North America. More information is available at http://BakeSpaceMedia.com.

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Social Good Stars: @Causecast CEO Ryan Scott on the Future of Cause Marketing #nptech

29 Mar
This article originally appears on The Huffington Post.
Amy Neumann

Writer, Speaker; Social Media Consultant

Social Good Stars: Causecast CEO Ryan Scott on the Future of Cause Marketing

This is the seventh installment of the Impact series, #SocialGoodStars. The people highlighted here are passionate, dedicated philanthropists, strengths to their communities, and social media masters. They also happily share their vast knowledge with others, making them shine as leaders in the Social Good world. You can read the sixth interview with Craigslist Founder Craig Newmark here.

“Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” -Theodore Roosevelt

Ryan Scott, CEO of Causecast, is a visionary idealist with a plan. He is a successful entrepreneur and thinker; a humanist and a philanthropist; and an investor and adviser to many interesting companies and charities. Also, he co-founded two of my favorite sections of the Huffington Post: Impact, and Education. His passion for doing the right thing — like not charging nonprofits a cent to use Causecast’s platform to help their cause — has helped spur global growth in cause marketing and its effectiveness. As a leader in the cause marketing field, he has some inspiring and thought-provoking insights into the future of Social Good.

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Photo courtesy of Causecast.com.You are widely regarded as the “Father of Opt-In Email Marketing.” You gave people an additional voice and freedom (to opt-in, or not) before people even asked. How did that affect your charity vision?

Opt-in was the result of my sense of social justice. We have the technology to ask people to subscribe rather than spam them and force them to opt-out – or in the case of the postal world, just spam them without regard for whether or not they want to get off the list. We have the technology for mass customization so what is the excuse for not using it? We can do direct marketing in an ethical way on the internet, and in fact we have to, so let’s do it.

My charity vision comes from that same sense of social justice. We ask nonprofits to solve the world’s toughest problems with a challenging business model. As a society, we reward selling sugar water far more than we reward building wells. This perverse incentive does nothing to solve the issue of lack of clean water, but it creates the altogether new problem of obesity. Clearly this is not sustainable. Capitalism can and must be better leveraged to help nonprofits do their work. It’s just too powerful of a force to ignore. Luckily, it’s pretty easy to harness the power of capitalism and by vastly improving this mutually beneficial partnership we will start to actually solve the world’s most pressing problems.
As a proponent of environmentalism and social justice, what social media platforms have jumped out at you as far as helping there?

The major social networks and publishing platforms can have a huge impact on social awareness and change. I can’t point to just one — as a marketer you have to use them all for their strengths. Unfortunately this is not one of those questions that has an easy solution.

You are active with many organizations, including Keiretsu Forum, the President’s Council of Planned Parenthood, the Long Now Foundation, and the Methuselah Foundation, among others. Are there trends you’ve seen online that have helped with expanding these causes?

Developments in the online world have increased the capacity of nonprofits and opened up new possibilities. For example, at Causecast we introduced free donation processing, which makes giving far less costly, and the ability for nonprofits to participate in workplace giving programs of corporations, also for free. But there are also pitfalls to online cause innovations. There is so much noise online, and it can be easy to create an app that is too difficult for NPOs to follow. Worse, I’ve seen some cause marketing campaigns where the brands are getting much more value than the nonprofit partners. I’ve seen many smaller nonprofits spend valuable time promoting a brand but competing against far more popular nonprofits, giving them no hope of winning. The time spent promoting the brand would have been better spent honing their core fundraising skills. Luckily there a lot of exceptions to this, for example Toyota’s 100 Cars for Good program in which all participating organizations walk away with something for their time, and organizations are paired with other organizations of similar size, making it more fair.
What other trends do you think nonprofits can leverage right now to help advance their message?

Workplace giving and volunteer programs are becoming a critical aspect of employee engagement, which is an essential key to employee recruitment and retention. Traditional corporate philanthropy only goes so far — companies need to get their entire workforce involved in order to make a difference, and nonprofits should make sure that they’re exposed to employee-based streams of fundraising and volunteerism. When employees get involved with nonprofits as a part of workplace programs, everyone benefits — nonprofits, the engaged employees and corporate bottom lines. That’s why Causecast developed a technology platform to help nonprofits connect with business workforces.


Social good marketing gets a lot of positive coverage these days. Do you feel it’s a win/win for brands and nonprofits? How do consumers/donors benefit from these social good partnerships?

It’s always a good thing when the private sector supports the public sector, no matter what the reasons. But cause marketing can feel like just that — marketing — if it’s not backed up by authentic engagement by the employees of the company.
Where do you see “Social Good/Cause Marketing” heading in the next two years?

Cause marketing is clearly the future of marketing. In fact, when you see that 90% of consumers will switch brands to one that supports a cause, you quickly realize that all marketing will be cause marketing. Despite some attempts at causewashing, it’s here to stay.

As you can tell, I’m really excited about employee cause engagement or workplace giving and volunteering. In fact, I predict all cause marketing campaigns will ultimately be launched to the public from within the workplace, by the employees of the corporation, not solely from the marketing department. Because what, after all, is the heart and soul of a company? Its staff. If they pick the nonprofits the company should support, if they are involved in crafting and promoting the campaign, it’s as authentic as it can be.

Soon, and this is our most active area of development, we’ll see companies competing with each other to make the most positive social change. I can’t think of a better reason to be hopeful for the future than that.

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Ryan Scott, CEO of Causecast.Learn more about Ryan Scott on LinkedIn, and follow him on Twitter @ryan_scott.

Amy Neumann is a social entrepreneur, writer, speaker and consultant on social good marketing. Check out her Charity Ideas Blog and follow her on Twitter @CharityIdeas.

Follow Amy Neumann on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CharityIdeas

The Unpredictable Freedom and Sweetness of Chaos – @Zen_Habits

16 Mar

Do you ever feel overwhelmed by the sheer number of things that don’t go exactly as planned?  We all do! But as Leo Babauta of the fabulous ZenHabits.net explains in this post, maybe that’s not a bad thing.  In fact, maybe it holds secrets to nourishing our creativity and passion.  Read on to see how!

The Unpredictable Freedom and Sweetness of Chaos

‘You must have chaos within you to give birth to a dancing star.’ ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Post written by Leo Babauta. (Originally appears here on zenhabits.net)

I’m going to share a productivity, planning and organizational hack that will change your life. It will yield some unpredictable results, but if you approach it the right way, it could bring some of the most amazing work of your life, along with freedom, joy, exhilaration.

What’s this miraculous hack?

It’s a simple one: let go. Let go of control and allow yourself to be swept away by the powerful currents of life. Let go of planning and embrace not know what will happen. Let go of productivity and be open to new ideas, new opportunities, spontaneous creativity.

The Case for Chaos

Consider what we’re doing when we plan our day, our week, our year: we are trying to exert control over life, and predict with our plans the course our lives will take today, this week, this year.

We are saying: this is what I’m going to do today. This is how things will go. If I get these things done, life will be good. This is my idea of what this day will hold.

Now consider this: we have absolutely no idea if any of this is true. We cannot predict the future with any kind of certainty, and the idea that we can plan based on these shaky predictions is a nice fiction, but a fiction nonetheless. We do not know what will happen today, much less the rest of the week or month. Knowing what will happen this year? What a crock!

And consider: what if we could know? What if we could accurately predict every single day, and plan each day exactly? Would this be a great thing? I submit that it would suck infinitely more than not knowing. Having foreknowledge of the future means we know what will happen each day, which means not only will our days be ridiculously boring, but we’re stuck on one unshakable path. Foreknowledge means a crazy lack of freedom.

So we don’t know what will happen, nor should we want to. We can try to plan, but those plans are not based on real knowledge and probably won’t happen, so planning is a waste of time.

What can we do instead of trying to predict what will happen, instead of planning? Learn to embrace uncertainty, and be open to change. Learn to let go of control, and surf the ever-changing wave. Let unpredictability rule, let randomness be the force of our life, let spontaneity be the rule.

Embracing Chaos for Good

Some random thoughts based on my experiments with letting go:

  • Work is better with chaos. While the idea of having peaceful order to our workday is a nice one, it’s an illusion. And it’s frankly boring. Work based on fun, play, and spontaneity is more interesting. Imagine a project that is started with a spontaneous idea, and then changes course as you do it, embraces the ideas of strangers, ends up in a fantastic new place you could not have possibly foreseen when you started. This is how I did my last book, The Effortless Life, and it was one of the most fun I’ve ever had on a project. It’s how I’m doing all my projects now, actually.
  • A year that isn’t planned. When I started Zen Habits in 2007, I had my year planned out in detail, with goals, actions and weekly plans. That, of course, was tossed out the door as soon as I started writing Zen Habits and meeting my first readers, who changed my life with their feedback and kind attention. My life was turned upside down, my plans became meaningless, and I learned that while life is unpredictable, that unpredictability can bring some amazing things.
  • Be open to new possibilities. I learned, that first year of Zen Habits, to be open to new opportunities. Time and time again, new doors opened for me that I didn’t know — couldn’t know — would even be there. I saw the new door opening, considered it, and went in. That happened repeatedly, and taught me that there is no way to plan a path when you don’t know what each step will bring, what changes will happen to that path as you walk along it.
  • Be open to strangers. Let’s say you plan your day rigidly. You’ve got your productivity system honed, you’re cranking out the tasks. You are a productivity machine! But now you randomly happen upon a stranger who says hi. You say hi back, and now you have a new opportunity: you can talk to this stranger, get to know him. But then you’d deviate from the plan! Do you stick to the plan, or talk to the stranger? Well, sticking to the plan would be more productive, and give you more control over your life. But if you talk to the stranger, you might make a new friend. You might learn something you’d never have learned otherwise. I’ve made some of my best friends like this, because I was willing to deviate from my plans and talk to a stranger.
  • Chaos is creativity, and creativity is chaos. They are the same thing. Creative work doesn’t happen by plan and control. Sure, some of the worlds creative geniuses were detail freaks, but they didn’t make a plan to come up with a creative genius idea — it came to them because they were open to random thoughts, explored paths no one else had thought to look down, took an idea they saw from someone else and twisted it in a new way. Creativity comes from a place of chaos, and it’s only when you open yourself to this lack of control that you can come up with your best creativity.
  • Some things to read: Two of the best books I’ve read recently embrace the idea of uncertainty, and they also happened to come at me from two of my best friends — both of whom I met almost randomly on the Internet. My friend Jonathan Fields wrote Uncertainty, and it’s a great exploration of some of these ideas. My friend Mary Jaksch sent me a book the other day called Bring Me the Rhinoceros that is an excellent use of Zen koans to explore similar ideas. Both books highly recommended.
  • When we let go of our expectations that others will make us happy, we enjoy them more. We get angry and frustrated at people because they don’t act the way we want them to. We expect others to try to make us happy, to go out of their way to give us what we want. This is not why other people exist. When we let go of these expectations, we accept people for who they are, and learn to appreciate this uniqueness.
  • If you don’t expect things to go as planned, you are open to the unplanned. Something might arise that is unexpected, and if you go with it, you’ll have to let go of your previous plans. This can be a wonderful thing. Many people (including the old me) get frustrated when new things come up that were unplanned, when plans go awry, but it doesn’t have to be frustrating. Just expect plans to change, or don’t really plan at all. Expect unplanned things to happen, and when they do, smile.
  • Embrace not knowing what will happen. This is the ultimate freedom. You don’t know what you’re going to do today, nor what will come up. You are locked into nothing. You are completely free to do anything, to pursue any creative pursuit, to try new things as they come up, to be open to meeting new people. It can be scary at first, but if you smile when you think of not knowing, you’ll soon realize it’s a joyous thing.
  • When you’re not focused on one outcome, you open the possibility for many outcomes. Most people are focused on specific goals (outcomes), and relentlessly pursue that outcome. They then dismiss other possibilities as distractions. But what if you have no predetermined outcome? What if you say that anywhere you end up could be good? You now open an infinite amount of possibilities, and you’re much more likely to learn something than if you only try to do the things and learn the things that support your predetermined outcome.

‘It’s a cruel and random world, but the chaos is all so beautiful.’ ~Hiromu Arakawa

On Ventureneer: 25 Best Social Media for Social Good Blogs

1 Feb

This is a fantastic collection of Social Media for Social Good blogs, put together by another great blog I often ReTweet: Ventureneer.  I’ve RT’d this particular article dozens of times, and adore every blog listed.  Read on for some of the smartest ideas, and most creative minds, in the Social Good space!  A big THANK YOU to @Ventureneer!

25 Best Social Media for Social Good Blogs

Values-driven organizations – nonprofits, social enterprises and socially responsible small businesses – face a special challenge: balancing social good and mission with revenue generation.Ventureneer has put together a list of the 25 Best Social Media for Social Good Blogs, those blogs that “get” the challenge of mission and/or provide useful information about social media. We hope this resource will encourage and guide values-driven organizations as they expand their use of social media.Why did we make this list? Who are we anyway? Our favorites. How did we rate them? Suggest a blog for next year’s list.
Rating Blog Name Blog Focus
1 Nonprofit Tech 2.0: A Social Media Guide for NPO’s Solid information any nonprofit can use when implementing social media.
2 A.Fine Blog Intelligent, focused.
3 NetWits ThinkTank Nice balance of big picture and details.
4 Amy Sample Ward’s Version of NPtech She keeps up with what’s going so you don’t have to.
5 Socialbrite Excellent how to’s.
6 Social Media Explorer Good general social media information.
7 Sarah Durham’s Duck Call Detailed posts that allow you to drill down to the info you need.
8 Kivi Leroux Miller Nonprofit Marketing Guide Social media within a marketing framework. One of the best.
9 Beth Kanter Eclectic, reflecting the personal curiosity of someone dedicated to improving the use of technology by nonprofits.
10 Katya Andresen Nonprofit Marketing Blog Accessible, helpful tech info for novices.
11 Nonprofit Technology Network Not for the beginner but great once you get started.
12 FrogLoop blog On the mark: social media for social good.
13 Richard Millington/ Feverbee Very specific to community building; excellent!
14 Chris Brogan Practical advice anyone can use.
15 Geoff Livingston In your face writing, thought-provoking, challenging.
16 Joe Waters/Selfish Giving Great info about using social media in a cause marketing campaign.
17 Jay Baer Insights you don’t see elsewhere.
18 Social Media Today Social media strategies for the business side of social good.
19 Social Mouths Good general social media info and how-tos, not for beginners.
20 Companies for Good Excellent tidbits on a wide variety of topics.
21 Social Impact For more advanced, tech savvy readers.
22 John Haydon The place for Facebook info.
23 Jocelyn Harmon Good basics for nonprofits; conversational, practical, and sometimes thought-provoking.
24 Laura Quinn Engaging, tech-focused but accessible.
25 The Dragonfly Effect Runs the gamut, from inspiring to practical, from nonprofit to social enterprise but always social media.

Social Good Stars: LinkedIn’s Meg Garlinghouse : Tips and Tricks for LinkedIn

25 Jan

This article originally appeared in the Huffington Post.

Amy Neumann

Writer, Speaker; Social Media Consultant

Social Good Stars: LinkedIn’s Meg Garlinghouse

Posted: 01/24/2012 9:40 am

This is the fifth installment of the Impact series, #SocialGoodStars. The people highlighted here are passionate, dedicated philanthropists, strengths to their communities, and social media masters. They also happily share their vast knowledge with others, making them shine as leaders in the Social Good world. You can read the fourth interview with Mark Horvath of Invisible People here.

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”
~Winston Churchill

If anyone understands the overlap of our professional and charitable lives, it’s Meg Garlinghouse. She is head of LinkedIn for Good, connecting 135+ million professionals’ knowledge and experience with nonprofits’ needs, globally.  With nearly twenty years of experience in the technology and philanthropy sectors, a background in international development, and time with the Peace Corps, she’s learned first-hand the power of giving. She also currently serves on the Boards of Network for Good and VolunteerMatch. Her Twitter bio notes: “Coffee Addict. Peace Corps Volunteer. Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie Enthusiast. LinkedIn for Good. Bias for action.” So grab some coffee (and pie?) and learn more about how the worlds of social good and personal growth are intersecting.
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Photo courtesy of Nan Palmero (Flickr).

“You personally spent time in the Peace Corps, and have helped with programs leveraging the power of the internet at several organizations including Yahoo!, Network For Good, VolunteerMatch, and of course LinkedIn. Do you have any advice for people looking at ways to jump into philanthropy, in person and online?”

There has been no better time than now for individuals to get involved in philanthropy and have a huge impact. The Internet enables people to find the perfect philanthropic or volunteering opportunity that matches what they care about with ways they can provide support. Coined by DonorsChoose, the notion of citizen philanthropist, the ability for any individual to raise funds and awareness for causes, is also gaining traction. Through nonprofits like Charity:Water, you become the fundraiser for the organization, leveraging your connections to create an even bigger impact for the cause.

I have a strong bias that individuals should use their unique skills and experience to impact an organization. While cash resources are always important, we desperately need people’s knowledge, skills and experience to come up with new solutions to old problems. The Internet also allows people to collaborate or crowdsource knowledge, insights and information. Some of my favorite examples of this include Sparked and Ushahidi.
“What recommendations do you have for professionals using LinkedIn, to help them leverage personal volunteering experience and share their favorite causes with others?”

This fall LinkedIn launched a Volunteer and Causes field that enables you to add your volunteer work, causes you care about and the organizations you support to your LinkedIn profile. We wanted to make it easy for professionals to include their social impact as part of their professional identity. In addition to the field being an important addition to your professional profile, it also helps nonprofits build their brand. Your association with an organization is an implicit endorsement and can help strengthen its brand and drive awareness. Your connections will be automatically notified when you add this field.

And don’t forget, volunteering is good for your career. There is a great deal of data that indicates that employers care about volunteer work. According to a survey LinkedIn did, 1 out of every 5 hiring managers agree that they have hired a candidate specifically because of their volunteer work.


“Can you talk about the mission behind the newly-created LinkedIn for Good Foundation?”

I think companies’ biggest opportunity to impact the world lies in what their core mission and unique assets are. LinkedIn is in the business of connecting talent with opportunity. The mission of LinkedIn for Good is: Connect the talent and passion of professionals with opportunities to use their skills to make a positive impact on the world. The Foundation that we just created is 100% employee-managed and focuses on leveraging the talents of our employees to impact nonprofit organizations.
“Have you seen any trends with nonprofits and LinkedIn? Where do you see online philanthropy headed for 2012 and beyond?”

I believe that human capital is the future of philanthropy. This skill-based, or pro bono marketplace is in its infancy but we are beginning to see a movement. Professionals, particularly Millenials, are looking for more ways they can make an impact through the workplace. Corporations (HP, Microsoft, IBM, Gap, Deloitte and others) are investing heavily in programs that inspire their employees to participate in skill-based volunteering. And several nonprofits have emerged to create a marketplace that connects the right professional with the right opportunity. Taproot is certainly a thought leader in this space who is driving this movement. Other interesting organizations to watch include CatchaFire and Sparked.

I believe that in 2012 and beyond this trend will continue to grow and the collaboration of human knowledge and passion from every corner of the earth will result in some game-changing solutions to the many global challenges we face.
“Where can people find resources and tips LinkedIn for Good offers for philanthropy professionals and nonprofits?”

We created a Learning Center specifically for nonprofits and nonprofit professionals.

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Meg Garlinghouse, Employment Branding and Community at LinkedIn.

You can learn more about Meg on LinkedIn and follow her on Twitter @MegGarling. Another helpful LinkedIn for Nonprofits expert is Bryan Breckenridge or @BGBreck.

Amy Neumann is a writer, speaker and consultant on social good marketing. Check out her CharityIdeasBlog and follow her on Twitter @CharityIdeas.

Follow Amy Neumann on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CharityIdeas

Thank You Everyone Who Supported #12DaysofGiving! $13,725 Raised!

29 Dec

I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought; and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.  ~G.K. Chesterton

It’s incredible to think about how everyone came together in social media and in 12 Days of Giving, donated $13,725!  Words alone cannot express enough gratitude…the thrill of seeing the teamwork and passion around this group effort of giving, and the impact that resulted!  Thanks to the 12 Champions and 12 Causes and to Crowdrise for sharing these amazing causes with all of your friends!  Wow.  Thousands of small, meaningful actions really can change the world, and social media proves that every day!

Here’s a list of the 212 individual donations #12DaysofGiving received.  THANK YOU!

:: Thanks! ~>     Rick and Kathy    :: Thanks! ~>     Kathy Meyer
:: Thanks! ~>     Anonymous    :: Thanks! ~>     Hoang
:: Thanks! ~>     Zee from D town !!!    :: Thanks! ~>     Callie Davis
:: Thanks! ~>     Sam & Patti Mccormck    :: Thanks! ~>     Lori McIlwain
:: Thanks! ~>     Tharin Clarijs    :: Thanks! ~>     Cheryl Burgess
:: Thanks! ~>     Shonali Burke    :: Thanks! ~>     @shikemore
:: Thanks! ~>     Sally Stokes    :: Thanks! ~>     April J. Rudin
:: Thanks! ~>     Paull Young    :: Thanks! ~>     @DoinaOncel
:: Thanks! ~>     Fiona & Waffle    :: Thanks! ~>     Jeanine Becker
:: Thanks! ~>     Bridger Hammond    :: Thanks! ~>     @lindsayfultz
:: Thanks! ~>     Harlie Hammond    :: Thanks! ~>     Adam L Stanley
:: Thanks! ~>     Lisa Brookes Kift    :: Thanks! ~>     Mitch, Jody, Derek & Josh
:: Thanks! ~>     Lisa Brookes Kift    :: Thanks! ~>     Anonymous
:: Thanks! ~>     Haney Armstrong    :: Thanks! ~>     fareastphillips
:: Thanks! ~>     Stephanie McAuliffe    :: Thanks! ~>     Paula in Kansas
:: Thanks! ~>     Beth Kanter     :: Thanks! ~>     RachelintheOC
:: Thanks! ~>     Debby Lee    :: Thanks! ~>     @kanter
:: Thanks! ~>     Beth, Walter, Harry, and Sara    :: Thanks! ~>     Gabrielle Gardner
:: Thanks! ~>     Todd Jordan    :: Thanks! ~>     Carolyn Gardner – @OurTownMagazine
:: Thanks! ~>     In Memory of B. Ochs    :: Thanks! ~>     @lisadekleyn
:: Thanks! ~>     Chris Brogan    :: Thanks! ~>     Anonymous
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Help a Woman Break the Chains of Domestic Violence – #12DaysOfGiving

20 Dec

The Holidays are about giving, sharing, and spreading joy, which is why I’m honored to be part of the “12 Days of Giving!”

Sometimes things aren’t all smiles and happiness, though. As a survivor of domestic violence myself, I’ve had a few rough holidays in the past. So have many others. In fact, according to the CDC, 1 of every 4 women and 1 in 9 men in the United States are victims of domestic violence at some point in their lives.

Luckily, there’s a way to make it easier for a woman (or man) to take the first step to shattering the chains of abuse, by talking with someone about the situation… someone with the knowledge and ability to help.

That’s why I choose the National Domestic Violence Hotline, 1-800-799-SAFE (7233), 1-800-787-3224 (TTY). Hotline advocates are available for victims and anyone calling on their behalf to provide crisis intervention, safety planning, information and referrals to agencies in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Assistance is available in English and Spanish with access to more than 170 languages through interpreter services.

Who are Domestic Violence victims?

Domestic violence can happen to anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion or gender. It can happen to couples who are married, living together or who are dating. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels.

Here are four helpful resources to learn more, help yourself, or help a loved one or friend. And please give if you can.


What is Domestic Violence?

How can I help a friend?

Am I being abused?

What is a safety plan?

If you are a victim/survivor of domestic violence, the important thing to remember is this: It’s not your fault. The abuser very intentionally, methodically, and usually gradually, grinds down your self-worth, isolates you from friends, family, and favorite activities, and increasingly adds verbal abuse, threats and escalating physical violence. Their favorite weapons are secrecy and control. It makes it very tough to have enough courage to break free.

The first step to breaking the chains is telling someone.

The good news is, as in my case, sometimes talking to someone at a hotline like National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233), where they know much more about the process abusers use – the secrecy, control, manipulation, threats, isolation, and violence – makes it much easier. You recognize that you are not at fault. You realize this is actually, sadly, very common – and you aren’t alone. You realize people will understand. You see that it will only get worse if nothing is done. You get help with the process of safely leaving, taking legal action like getting a restraining order, and other things that are not knowledge anyone has until they need it.

74% of Americans know someone affected by domestic violence. And since you just read this article, now you definitely do too. I was able to come out of the dark and break the chains with help. Can you please help another hurting person do the same? Thank you.

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, the National Domestic Violence Hotline can help: 1-800-799-7233 (SAFE) or NDVH.org.

Learn more by following @12DaysGiving and the hashtag #12DaysOfGiving on Twitter.

And I’d love to connect with you on Twitter @CharityIdeas!

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